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Maine VolunteerFare

Point of Entry: Recruiting College Students

Published October 31, 2006


Points of Entry

From Recruiting College Students: A Guide for Volunteer Recruitment and Management

Once you have developed a plan, you are ready to make that first contact with the school. BB/BSA agencies have taken a number of different approaches. Many have successfully persuaded colleges to donate in-kind services, or provide funding and transportation for newly developed BB/BSA programs. Some agencies have approached the students directly, while others have approached specific departments that could help them meet their needs. Listed below are some of the more common points of entry:

Administrative Offices

One option is to approach the university's student affairs office or dean of students office. In this case, you should know exactly what it is you want from the office, in addition to what your agency can offer the institution to help it achieve its goals. There is an increasing trend across the country for colleges to establish volunteer community service offices on campus to accommodate and encourage a variety of student interests in community service.

BB/BS of Southeastern Connecticut has developed a mentor program where students from the Volunteer Community Service Office of Connecticut College help the agency in the recruitment and intake of volunteers, after being trained by BB/BSA agency personnel....

Specific Departments

Many BB/BSA agencies have used the services of college departments such as Psychology, Marketing, Sociology, Social Work, Art and others depending on agency needs. Agencies have had most success with graduate departments, although there are some areas where undergraduate programs are just as effective. Some agencies recruit psychology administrators to evaluate their 16-PF and other personality tests. Others have drafted art students to do some of their advertising work. Many universities have the facilities and talent to produce broadcast-quality public service announcements and may be approached for such assistance. College athletic and food service departments have helped agencies with transportation and meals for special collaborative programs. Agencies have also requested the use of space and facilities as a first step in their relationship with the college in their area.

Fraternal Organizations

Some agencies approach students individually and/or enlist sororities and fraternities or groups such as the Pan-Hellenic Council to help them recruit more students to serve as mentors for youth.

Excerpted from Recruiting College Students: A Guide for Volunteer Recruitment and Management, © 1995, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of America. Found in the Energize, Inc. website library at http://www.energizeinc.com/art.html

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